THE EFFECTS OF A SELF-EFFICACY BASED TREATMENT PROGRAM ON AT-RISK SECONDARY EDUCATION STUDENTS’ LEVELS OF GENERAL SELF-EFFICACY AND ACHIEVEMENT MOTIVATION

David Mirto, Western Connecticut State University

Abstract

This study investigated the impact of a researcher created intervention on general levels of self-efficacy and achievement motivation of secondary education students within a district classified as at-risk. The design was experimental and utilized a pre/post-test comparison and a convenience sample of randomly assigned intact groups of tenth grade students (n = 59). General Self Efficacy and Achievement Motivation were measured to determine if a statistical difference existed in the mean scores of the groups after treatment.

Research Question One investigated if a significant difference existed between program types and students’ General Self-Efficacy with respect to gender. Results illustrated no significant main effect on general self-efficacy F(118.208) = .169, p = .683, partial eta squared = .003. Results identified a significant main effect in general self-efficacy between genders, F(5377.801) = 7.668, p = .008, partial eta squared = .122. Results identified no significant interaction between program and students’ general self-efficacy with respect to gender, F(6.174) = .009, p = .926, partial eta squared = .000.

Research Question Two investigated if a significant difference existed between program types and students’ Achievement Motivation with respect to gender. Results illustrated no significant main effect on achievement motivation, F(6397.806) = 1.262, p = .266, partial eta squared = .022. There was no significant main effect in achievement motivation between genders, F(542.461) = .107, p = .266, partial eta squared = .022. Results identified no significance in the interaction between program and students achievement motivation with respect to gender, F(12114.024) = 2.390, p = .128, partial eta squared = .042.