Date of Award

Summer 8-2017

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Education & Educational Psychology

First Advisor

Catherine O'Callaghan, PhD

Second Advisor

Kathryn Campbell, PhD

Third Advisor

Pauline Goolkasian, EdD

Fourth Advisor

Marcia A. B. Delcourt, PhD

Abstract

The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to investigate the effect of a self-regulation treatment on sixth grade students’ reading comprehension, motivation for learning, and self-efficacy perceptions.

The research took place in three urban schools in the northeast United States in the winter of 2016. The study’s quasi-experimental design utilized a sample of convenience in which students from three schools of one district were examined. There was one treatment group in which students received a self-regulation intervention and two comparison groups where students received standard support instruction within their general education classes. Data were collected using a pretest/posttest method. Self-efficacy, motivation for learning, and reading comprehension were assessed for all students in both the treatment and comparison groups prior to the intervention, and at the end of the intervention. Analyses examined treatment effects on reading comprehension, motivation for learning, and self-efficacy. Results from this self-regulation treatment did not reveal statistically significant results for the effect of self-regulation strategies or standard reading support program on reading comprehension. There was not a significant difference between observed and expected frequencies for motivation for learning for the Self-Efficacy for Learning and Performance subscale of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. There was a significant difference between observed and expected frequencies for motivation for learning on the Metacognitive Self-Regulation subscale of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. An examination of the standardized residuals reveals that response four for the comparison group was the main contributor to this significant chi-square test. There was not a significant difference between observed and expected frequencies on the Progress subscale of the Reader Self-Perception Scale.